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The international agreement on climate change, also known as the Paris Agreement, is a legally-binding framework developed by the United Nations to combat global warming. The agreement was signed in 2015 by 195 countries and came into effect in 2016. Its primary aim is to limit the increase in global temperature to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, with a goal of limiting it to 1.5°C.

The Paris Agreement is a milestone in global efforts to address climate change. It is the first agreement of its kind to involve every country in the world, including both developed and developing nations. By establishing a common goal and encouraging countries to take action, it is helping to create a global momentum for climate action.

One of the key features of the Paris Agreement is the nationally determined contributions (NDCs) that each country sets for itself. These are voluntary pledges that outline the actions a country will take to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. The NDCs are reviewed every five years, with the aim of encouraging countries to progressively increase their ambition over time.

The Paris Agreement also includes provisions for financing and technology transfer to support developing countries in their efforts to tackle climate change. Developed countries have committed to providing $100 billion each year in climate finance by 2020, with a goal of increasing this amount in the future.

While the Paris Agreement represents a significant step forward in international efforts to address climate change, there are still challenges to be addressed. One of the main issues is the lack of enforcement mechanisms, which means that countries are not legally bound to meet their NDCs. However, the transparency and accountability mechanisms built into the agreement are designed to encourage countries to meet their commitments and hold them accountable if they do not.

Another challenge is the need for greater ambition in the NDCs. The current pledges are not sufficient to limit global warming to the agreed upon targets. However, the five-year review process provides an opportunity for countries to revise and strengthen their commitments.

In conclusion, the international agreement on climate change is an important step forward in global efforts to address the impacts of climate change. By establishing a common goal and encouraging each country to take action, it is creating momentum for climate action. While there are still challenges to be addressed, the Paris Agreement represents a significant milestone in the fight against global warming.